Collection Find – Pearson Nailer

Pearson Nailer

Pearson Nailer

Phyllis and Ann enjoyed researching this “Pearson’s Nailer” from 1908. It holds and dispenses nails. The nails move down a chute and are released into a standing position under a piston. The user then  manually pounds the piston with a hammer to  drive the nail into a board. It is a clever labor – and finger-saving device. This early version of a portable nailing machine was patented as early as 1892 by the Martin Pearson Manufacturing Co. of Robbinsdale, Minnesota.

Pound the piston with a hammer to drive the nail.

Pound the piston with a hammer to drive the nail.

The nails slid down the slots into a standing position under the piston.

The nails slid down the slots into a standing position under the piston.

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About popecountymuseum

This blog is primarily written by Ann Grandy, Assistant Curator.
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7 Responses to Collection Find – Pearson Nailer

  1. Liz Glassner says:

    Have you also found out the value of this nailer? I’m curious.
    Liz

    • popecountymuseum says:

      Hi Liz,
      We don’t usually look up the monetary value of our artifacts. We try to focus on their history.
      But, in the course of our research, I did find one on an on-line auction site. The seller was asking for $65. I did not follow up to see if it sold. There is often a large difference between “asking” price and what someone is willing to pay.
      And I have discovered that most websites require you to pay a subscription fee if you want to see what an item actually sold for.
      So, long story short – I don’t really know what the dollar value of the nailer is. But it sure is interesting!
      Ann

  2. chris hinkle says:

    I am interested in one of these as a collector.
    Chris

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